The Badminton Bible

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All original content copyright © Mike Hopley

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Deceptive cross-court net shots

Often cross-court net shots work better if they’re played with deception, so your opponent thinks you’re playing straight. Make your preparation look the same as a straight net shot, then at the last moment change the angle.

Lifts article

This article may be old, but it contains topics we haven’t covered in our newer content yet, such as cross-court lift technique and dealing with spin.

Lifts introduction

Lifts are played from the forecourt and midcourt. They travel high and to the back of the opponent’s court.

Lifts: technique details

Look at lift technique in more detail. Perhaps too much detail; if you can finish this particular video then I’ll give you a scratch-and-sniff sticker.

Net kills article

This article may be old, but it contains topics that we haven’t covered in our newer content yet — such as playing kills from the midcourt.

Finger power net kills

Net kills are played from your net area, hitting the shuttle steeply downward to your opponent’s mid-court. It’s called a kill because it usually wins the rally. The finger power net kill is useful when the shuttle is relatively tight to the tape and you are close to the net.

Brush net kills

If the shuttle is very close to the net tape, a normal kill is likely to result in you hitting the tape. Instead, you can use a sideways brushing technique to kill the shuttle.

Arm rotation for clears and smashes

Arm rotation is essential for power in badminton. It’s used for all power shots, but it’s especially important for clears and smashes because they need the most power.

Drop shots article

This article may be old, but it contains topics that we haven’t covered in our newer content yet — such using deception with your drop shots.

Forehand drop shot introduction

Drop shots are hit softly from your rearcourt to land in the opponent’s forecourt. Let’s look at the basic technique.

Backhand clears article

This article explains the basic technique for a backhand clear.

Footwork article

This article may be old, but it contains topics we haven’t covered in our newer content yet, such as the ready position and forecourt footwork patterns.

Elements of badminton movement

Here’s an overview of the different types of movement in badminton.

What is a split step, and why does it matter?

The split step allows you to make a fast start, while still covering different shots from your opponent.

Lunges introduction

Learn how to lunge safely and efficiently.

Lunge technique details

Let’s look at some details of lunge technique, such as sliding in the back foot.

Step out footwork

This pattern moves you directly to the forehand rear corner, using the shortest route and covering the most ground. It’s a safe option that will work when you’re under pressure. It’s also less tiring.

Jump out footwork

You can reach the shuttle early by jumping into the corner. It’s mainly used to intercept flat lifts or clears so you can play an attacking shot, often a smash.

Arc step footwork

The arc step takes longer than the other patterns for reaching the forehand rear court, but you get into a better position for hitting the shot.

Round-the-head footwork intro

When you’re playing shots from the rear court, a forehand is much better than a backhand. You get more power, your vision is better, and you can immediately recover forwards.